Saturday, December 14, 2013

The Koh-I-Noor, Amathuxidia amythaon dilucida (Honrath)

Large unmistakable butterfly of the dark undergrowth, preferring rather undisturbed environment. They are sometimes attracted to rotting fruits or animal dung but are always very sensitive to human presence. Easily identifiable from other large Amathusiids by its purple-washed undersides with thin darker purple brown stripes running longitudinally along its undersides.

Habitat indicator
RSP
WV
PG
VF
FTR
SC
LWDF
LWPF
LMEF
UMN
MN







 x
 x



Frequency observation chart: (S marks the usual occurences, H marks an unusually high occurence, F for first record)

2013
2014
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mac
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct

S3FS3


S2S2S2


2014
2015
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mac
Apr
May
June
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec







S1


S2




2016
Jan
Feb
Mac
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

 S3
 S2

S2
S2
S2






2017
Jan
Feb
Mac
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec













This is a rather rare butterfly in the primary forest, much so at a certain elevation but this single individual was attracted to fallen rotting fruits on the forest floor. It was the middle of the monsoon season and the least expected time to find a nice butterfly but a break in the weather allowed some activities. It fluttered a short distance from the forest floor when I approached the pathway and it was easily spotted in flight with its beautiful purple-blue discal band flashing away, indicating a male. After being disturbed, it flew off and returned to the same spot after a few moments. Its large size coupled with broad beautiful blue bands contrasted to its dark uppersides makes it a sight to behold in the dark jungle floor when it took to the wings.

 Once settled among the thickets, it is almost impossible to spot it unless its flight path was keenly followed before it settled. 14 December 2013 @ 14:48.

 Flashlight brings out the light mauve tint of its undersides. 14 December 2013 @ 14:59.

A quick snap when it took to the wings - the blue flash indicated that it was a male specimen.

 15:14

It came back to the forest floor where rotting fruits were abundant. Above all photos from 14 December 2013 (notice that this specimen was infected with lice on its wings) (Site 3)


Site 2: I was surprised this pristine male specimen came to puddle on a moist spot: 15 June 2014 @ 10:05

Site 2: This male was feeding on some animal dung on a gravel path: 20 June 2014 @ 11:23

11:25

Site 2: Feeding on dung: 06 July 2014 @ 13:02

A broken forewing on the forest floor showing the brilliant blue apical band

a worn male showing the colours of the forewing uppers.

No comments:

Post a Comment